Diffusion, facilitated diffusion, active transport and osmosis

Diffusion, facilitated diffusion, active transport and osmosis

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
DIFFUSION FACILITATED DIFFUSION WATER POTENTIAL OSMOSIS And ACTIVE TRANSPORT Diffusion.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Diffusion is the passage of the ions or atoms or molecules that make up a substance, from where they are at a high concentration. In other words, particles of the substance diffuse down a concentration gradient. E.g if you put a drop of ink into a beaker of water, the ink gradually spreads through the water. They will have diffused from where they were in a high concentration in the original drop to where they are in a lower concentration in the surrounding water. These particles are moving at random. You can see this quite easily if you look at a tiny drop of toothpaste mixed with water under the microscope. The toothpaste particles move around, twisting and turning. They are moving because the molecules of water in which they are suspended are moving at random and are bumping into them. The kinetic energy that the molecules possess results in this movement. In a solid, the particles are fixed and cannot move relative to one another; in a liquid the molecules are free to move, but are close together, so bump into each other and change
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

Diffusion, facilitated diffusion, active transport and osmosis

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online