PSYCH PAPER - Nelson Liu Dr. Achee PSYC 1101 6 Oct. 2010...

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Nelson Liu Dr. Achee PSYC 1101 6 Oct. 2010 Ever been in an emergency, and no one was able to help? We’ve all been in that type of situation before. What we have experienced is called the “Bystander Effect.” The Bystander Effect is a social psychological occurrence in which no help is given if there are multiple people present. A high number of bystanders within the area lead to delayed help or no help at all. A low number of bystanders within the area lead to immediate help. This is mainly caused by the diffusion of responsibility, which states that, the more people around you, the less responsibility you feel to get help. If there are less people around, you feel more responsible to help. If there are more people around, you wait to see if anyone else does anything due to lessened responsibility. In many cases, help may be delayed if the emergency is ambiguous; you are unclear about what happened and debate whether it is an emergency or not. Help is also delayed if you think there is someone else more qualified to help, such as a doctor or policeman. Being able
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PSYCH PAPER - Nelson Liu Dr. Achee PSYC 1101 6 Oct. 2010...

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