Lec16 - Chapter 8 Carbohydrates Monosaccharides...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 8 Carbohydrates Monosaccharides Polysaccharides Glycoproteins
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(CH 2 O) n Energy from the sun is captured by plants is first stored as carbohydrates Oxidation of carbohydrates provides energy to sustain life Storage —polysaccharides Storage of information Glycolipids — biological membranes Glycoproteins Glycosaminoglycans Structural function —plants, insects, bacteria
Background image of page 2
1. Monosaccharides Classification Sugar Derivatives
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A. Classification of monosaccharides Monosaccharides differ from each other in the number of carbons and in the arrangement of H and O Aldose —carbonyl is a aldehyde Ketose —carbonyl is a ketone
Background image of page 4
Smallest carbohydrates D -glyceraldehyde Dihydroxyacetone In nature we rarely see monosaccharides containing more than seven carbons
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
D - Glucose Aldose 4 chiral carbons One of 16 possible stereoisomers D-Glucose Energy source Storage of energy Structural role in plants
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
D and L relate a given molecule to the configuration of glyceraldehyde D and L refers to the configuration of the optical carbon atom farthest from the carbonyl group We see mostly D-monosaccharides in nature D -glyceraldehyde D -glucose
Background image of page 8
D and L forms are mirror images of each other (enantiomers) Direction of optical rotation is usually specified
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/28/2010 for the course CHEM 114A taught by Professor Viadhiu during the Fall '08 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 37

Lec16 - Chapter 8 Carbohydrates Monosaccharides...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online