Lecture 7 - Flower Development OUTLINE I. Floral Organs and...

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Flower Development OUTLINE I. Floral Organs and their arrangements II. Variations in Floral Morphology A. Numbers of parts B. Fusions and loss of parts C. Variations in symmetry I. Development of flowers in Arabidopsis IV. Physiological Control of Transition to Flowering A. Daylength Responses B. Gibberellic Acid (GA) Responses V. Genes affecting the transition to flowering A. LEAFY ( LFY ) B. APETALA1 ( AP1 ) C. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS ( UFO ) D. Model for gene interactions VI. Genes affecting floral organ identity A. Class A, B, C genes - AP1 and AP2, AP3 and PI, AG B. SEPALLATA ( SEP ) genes C. Models for gene interactions VII. Control of corolla symmetry in snapdragon ( Antirrhinum ) Reading Assignment : Wolpert pgs 246-254
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Study Questions for Lecture 20 1. What is a flower and what lateral organs can be present? Describe the development of an Arabidopsis flower as you would see it using a scanning electron microscope. 1. What types of floral variation exist in flowering plants? 1. Describe the ABC model of floral organ determination. What gene interactions occur and what role do the SEPALLATA genes play? What is the resulting flower structure modification if you remove (via null mutation) an A gene? a B gene? the C gene? both A and B? both B and C? both A and C? 4. What is zygomorphy? How is it produced in snapdragon flowers?
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What is a flower? A flower is a rosette shoot with one or more of the following lateral organs: sepals, petals, stamens, carpels. When present, the lateral organs are always positioned in the same order: sepals on the bottom, petals above sepals, stamens above petals and carpels in the center. This rosette shoot is determinate: the central meristem is used up producing the carpels. The sexual organs are the stamens (male) that produce pollen, and carpels (female) that produce ovules.
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Flower parts and organ positions Fig. 6.26
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Stable Numbers of Parts Amplification of Parts
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Loss of Parts Fusion of Parts
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This note was uploaded on 10/31/2010 for the course CBNS 108 taught by Professor Green,demason during the Spring '10 term at UC Riverside.

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Lecture 7 - Flower Development OUTLINE I. Floral Organs and...

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