North_and_South_Tensions_from_1820-1860 - 1 Missouri Compromise of 1820(political \u25cf leading up to the Missouri Compromise of 1820 tensions began to

North_and_South_Tensions_from_1820-1860 - 1 Missouri...

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1. Missouri Compromise of 1820 (political) leading up to the Missouri Compromise of 1820, tensions began to rise between pro-slavery and anti- slavery factions within the U.S. Congress and across the country. They reached a boiling point after Missouri’s 1819 request for admission to the Union as a slave state, which threatened to upset the delicate balance between slave states and free states. To keep the peace, Congress orchestrated a two-part compromise, granting Missouri’s request but also admitting Maine as a free state. It also passed an amendment that drew an imaginary line across the former Louisiana Territory, establishing a boundary between free and slave regions that remained the law of the land until it was negated by the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. The Missouri Compromise was criticized by many southerners because it established the principle that Congress could make laws regarding slavery. 2. Nat Turner’s Rebellion ( social/culture) Nathanial “Nat” Turner (1800-1831) was a black American slave who led the only effective, sustained slave rebellion (August 1831). He was born on the Virginia plantation of Benjamin Turner, who allowed him to be instructed in reading, writing, and religion. An insurrection was planned, aborted, and rescheduled for August 21,1831, when he and six other slaves killed the Travis family, managed to secure arms and horses, and enlisted about 75 other slaves in a disorganized insurrection that resulted in the murder of 51 white people. Afterwards, Turner hid nearby successfully for six weeks until his discovery, conviction, and hanging at Jerusalem, Virginia, along with 16 of his followers. 3. Compromise of 1850 (political) The Compromise of 1850 was a package of five separate bills passed by the United States Congress in
September 1850, which defused a four-year political confrontation between slave and free states on the status of territories acquired during the Mexican–American War (1846–1848). Texas surrendered its claim to New Mexico as well as its claims north of 36°30' . It retained the Texas

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