Lecture Images part 2

Lecture Images part 2 - Lecture 7 Brainstem I organization...

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Lecture 7 - Brainstem I - organization, key landmarks and cross sections Announcements : Exam grading should be complete by Monday. Assignment : In Nolte read Chapter 11: “Organization of the brainstem”. For next lecture : Read Nolte Chapter 12: “Cranial nerves and their nuclei”. Lecture Outline : Brainstem - overview of important functions Brainstem - orientation and major subdivisions Brainstem surface anatomy Brainstem internal anatomy Introduction to brainstem cross sections Principal pathways are major components of the brainstem Review of principal pathways
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Brainstem I: Organization, key landmarks, and cross sectional anatomy
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The dorsal surface of the brainstem is covered by the cerebellum, which is therefore typically removed in study of the brainstem
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The three major subdivisions of the brainstem
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Important surface anatomical features of the brainstem
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Transverse planes (cross sections) defining the subdivisions of the brainstem. This is the key for the brainstem cross sections. Note that each third of the brainstem is subdivided, making a total of 6 primary brainstem sections. (there is an extra section to show the junction between the SC and caudal medulla).
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Cross sections through the rostral medulla (A), rostral pons (B), and rostral midbrain (C) revealing major longitudinal subdivisions. These are, from dorsal to ventral, the 1) tectum, or roof, the area posterior to the ventricular space, most developed in the midbrain; the 2) tegmentum (Latin for “covering”); and 3) large structures “appended” to the anterior surface of the tegmentum.
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The principal pathways are major components of the brainstem.
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posterior column - medial lemniscus pathway (fine touch and pressure; proprioception)
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posterior column - medial lemniscus pathway (fine touch and pressure; proprioception)
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Spinothalamic tract (pain and temperature)
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Corticospinal tract
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The spinocerebellar pathways
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11-8: caudal medulla near the spinomedullary junction
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11-9: caudal medulla, just caudal to the obex
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11-10: rostral medulla, just rostral to the obex
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11-11: caudal pons, at level of the facial colliculus
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11-13: midpons, at level of entry of CN V
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11-14: rostral pons, near pons-midbrain junction
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11-16: caudal midbrain, at the level of the inferior colliculus
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