black death, white death

black death, white death - trends deborah carr black death,...

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fall 2005 contexts 43 black death, white death trends deborah carr During the 20th century, scientists, physicians, and the public health community drastically reduced mortality rates, with an accompanying increase in life expectancy. Most men and women today can expect to live well into their 70s and 80s, whereas the 50th birthday celebration was a cherished and rare milestone at the turn of the 20th century. These dra- matic gains are largely due to improved sanitation, better medical care, and increased use of preventive health services. Yet not all Americans reap these rewards. Blacks die younger than whites, and the racial gap in mortality has bare- ly budged over the past half-century. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, white women outlive black women by roughly five years, with life expectancies at birth of 80.3 and 75.6 years. For men, the gap is even more pronounced; in 2002, white men’s life expectancy at birth was 75.1, compared to just 68.8 years for black men (see figure).
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This note was uploaded on 10/29/2010 for the course SOCI 150gm at USC.

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black death, white death - trends deborah carr black death,...

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