ch20 - PART IV Internetworking Using TCP/IP Internet...

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Unformatted text preview: PART IV Internetworking Using TCP/IP Internet architecture, addressing, binding, encapsulation, and protocols in the TCP/IP suite Chapters 20 Internetworking: Concepts, Architecture, and Protocols 21 IP: Internet Addressing 22 Datagram Forwarding 23 Support Protocols And Technologies 24 The Future IP (IPv6) 25 UDP: Datagram Transport Service 26 TCP: Reliable Transport Service 27 Internet Routing And Routing Protocols Chapter Contents 20.1 Introduction, 335 20.2 The Motivation For Internetworking, 335 20.3 The Concept Of Universal Service, 336 20.4 Universal Service In A Heterogeneous World, 336 20.5 Internetworking, 337 20.6 Physical Network Connection With Routers, 337 20.7 Internet Architecture, 338 20.8 Achieving Universal Service, 339 20.9 A Virtual Network, 339 20.10 Protocols For Internetworking, 341 20.11 Review Of TCP/IP Layering, 341 20.12 Host Computers, Routers, And Protocol Layers, 342 20.13 Summary, 342 20 Internetworking: Concepts, Architecture, and Protocols 20.1 Introduction Previous chapters describe basic networking, including the hardware components used in LAN and WAN networks as well as general concepts such as addressing and routing. This chapter begins an examination of another fundamental idea in computer communication — an internetworking technology that can be used to connect multiple physical networks into a large, uniform communication system. The chapter discusses the motivation for internetworking, introduces the hardware components used, describes the architecture in which the components are connected, and discusses the significance of the concept. The remaining chapters in this section expand the internetworking con-cept, and provide additional details about the technology. They examine individual pro-tocols, and explain how each uses techniques from earlier chapters to achieve reliable, error-free communication. 20.2 The Motivation For Internetworking Each network technology is designed to fit a specific set of constraints. For exam-ple, LAN technologies are designed to provide high-speed communication across short distances, while WAN technologies are designed to provide communication across large areas. Consequently, 335----336 Internetworking: Concepts, Architecture, and Protocols Chap. 20 No single networking technology is best for all needs. A large organization with diverse networking requirements needs multiple physical networks. More important, if the organization chooses the type of network that is best for each task, the organization will have several types of networks. For example, a LAN technology like Ethernet might be the best solution for connecting computers at a given site, but a leased data circuit might be used to interconnect a site in one city with a site in another....
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This note was uploaded on 10/29/2010 for the course ENGR 131 taught by Professor Purzer during the Spring '10 term at Purdue University.

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ch20 - PART IV Internetworking Using TCP/IP Internet...

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