3 - Social & Human Sciences Department (SAHSD) Centre for...

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PHD 0015 Human Development ONLINE NOTES FOSEE , MULTIMEDIA UNIVERSITY (436821-T) MELAKA CAMPUS, JALAN AYER KEROH LAMA, 75450 MELAKA, MALAYSIA. Tel 606 252 3594 Fax 606 231 8799 URL: http://fosee.mmu.edu.my/~asd/ (SAHSD) Centre for Foundation Studies and Extension Education (FOSEE)
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PHD0015 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Chapter 3 PHD 0015 Human Development Topic 3 Infancy Neonatal Period (Refer textbook Chapter 4) 1. The neonatal period is the time of transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. 2. Ninety-five percent of full-term newborns are 18 to 22 inches long and weigh between 5 ½ and 10 pounds. Boys tend to be slightly longer and heavier than girls. A firstborn child is likely to weigh less at birth than later-born children. 3. Size at birth is related to race, sex, parents’ size, and the mother’s nutrition and health. Size at birth tends to predict relative size later in childhood. 4. A neonate’s heartbeat is fast and irregular (about 120 to 150 beats per minute). Blood pressure does not stabilize until about the 10 th day. 5. Most babies start to breathe as soon as they are exposed to air. If breathing does not occur within about 5 minutes, the baby may suffer permanent brain injury caused by anoxia. 6. In the first several days of life, most newborns lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight before they learn to adjust to neonatal feeding. Once infants adjust to sucking, swallowing, and digesting, they grow rapidly, gaining an average of 5 to 6 ounces per week during the first month. 7. During the first few days, the lanugo falls off and the vernix caseosa dries up. The fontanels in the skull close within the first 18 months. 8. Jaundice may occur as a result of immature liver. This is treated by exposure to fluorescent light. 9. The brain is immature in which there are still large parts of it dysfunctional. The most functional is the brain stem, which controls breathing, digestion, and reflexes. 10. Newborns maintain their body temperature by having fat layers under their skin and by increasing their activity when temperature drops. 11. A newborn’s state of arousal is governed by periodic cycles of wakefulness, sleep, and activity. 12. A small minority of infants suffers lasting effects of birth trauma. Other complication includes low birthweight (either premature or small-to-date) and postmature birth. 13. Sudden infant death syndrome is the leading cause of death of infants. Measures of Neonatal Health and Responsiveness Apgar scale __________________________________________________________________________________ SRS 2/ 8
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PHD0015 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Chapter 3 1. Apgar scale is a standard measurement of a newborn’s condition within the first five minutes after birth. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 10/30/2010 for the course FOSEE CVL1040 taught by Professor None during the Spring '09 term at Multimedia University, Cyberjaya.

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3 - Social & Human Sciences Department (SAHSD) Centre for...

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