chapter6 - Chapter 6 Force and Motion II In this chapter we...

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Chapter 6 Force and Motion II In this chapter we will cover the following topics: Describe the frictional force between two objects. Differentiate between static and kinetic friction, study the properties of friction, and introduce the coefficients for static and kinetic friction. Study the drag force exerted by a fluid on an object moving through the fluid and calculate the terminal speed of the object. Revisit uniform circular motion and using the concept of centripetal force apply Newton’s second law to describe the motion. (6-1)
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We can explore the basic properties of friction by analyzing the following experiment based on our every day experiences. We have a heavy crate resting on the floor. We push the cra te to the Friction : left (frame b) but the crate does not move. We push harder (frame c) and harder (frame d) and the crate still does not move. Finally we push with all our strength and the crate moves (frame e). The free body diagrams for frames a-e show the existence of a new force which balances the force with which we push the crate. This force is called the . As we increase , s s f F F f G G static frictional force also increases and the crate remains at rest. When reaches a certain limit the crate "breaks away" and accelerates to the left. Once the crate starts moving the force opposing its motion is called t F he . . Thus if we wish the crate to move with constant speed we must decrease so that it balances (frame f). In frame (g) we plot versus time kk s k ff f F t < G kinetic frictional force (6-2)
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F F N mg The frictional force is acting between two dry unlubricated surfaces in cont act Properties of friction : If the two surfaces do not move with respect to each other, then the static frictional force
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This note was uploaded on 10/31/2010 for the course EE 423 taught by Professor Mitin during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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chapter6 - Chapter 6 Force and Motion II In this chapter we...

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