lecture8 - Mirrors Light and Color for Nonscientists PHYS...

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Mirrors Light and Color for Nonscientists PHYS 1230 Geometrical optics - how do we make images? Ray tracing for mirrors (spotlights, mag-lights, auto mirrors, make-up and shaving mirrors, globes, etc.)
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Mirrors Lots of different kinds - Shaving mirrors Make-up mirrors Rear and side view mirrors Globes Unlike flat mirrors, some of the above mirrors make the image bigger while others make the image smaller In some cases it matters how close you are to the mirror
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http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/lightandcolor/mirrorsintro.html FLAT or PLANE Mirrors - Surface of mirror is flat
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http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/lightandcolor/mirrorsintro.html History of Mirrors Predating even crude lenses, mirrors are perhaps the oldest optical element utilized by man to harness the power of light. Prehistoric cave dwellers were no doubt mesmerized by their reflections in undisturbed ponds and other bodies of water, but the earliest man-made mirrors were not discovered until Egyptian pyramidal artifacts dating back to around 1900 BC were examined. Mirrors made during the Greco- Roman period and the Middle Ages consisted of highly polished metals, such as bronze, tin, or silver, fashioned into slightly convex disks, which served mankind for over a millennium.
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http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/lightandcolor/mirrorsintro.html History of Mirrors It was not until the late Twelfth or early Thirteenth Centuries that the use of glass with a metallic backing was developed to produce looking glasses, but refinement of this technique took an additional several hundred years. By the sixteenth century, Venetian craftsmen were fabricating handsome mirrors fashioned from a sheet of flat glass coated with a thin layer of mercury-tin amalgam. Over the next few hundred years, German and French specialists developed mirror- making into a fine art, and exquisitely crafted mirrors decorated the halls, dining, living, and bedrooms of the European aristocracy.
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This note was uploaded on 11/01/2010 for the course PHYS 1230 taught by Professor Martingoldman during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

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lecture8 - Mirrors Light and Color for Nonscientists PHYS...

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