Multitasking - Ethical Dilemmas Small Busninesses Face

Multitasking - Ethical Dilemmas Small Busninesses Face -...

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Multitasking: The Ethical Dilemma Facing Small Businesses Chris Kirland and Craig Lilly Christopher.Kirland.08@cnu.edu , Craig.Lilly.05@cnu.edu Dr. Stephanie Bardwell, Business dept. bardwell@cnu.edu Abstract The purpose of this study is to examine the ethical dilemma of multi-tasking faced by small business owners. With fewer resources than larger organizations, the concept of multi-tasking becomes appealing to small business owners. A moderate sample (N = 115) of college students and business men and women was generated from the state of Virginia. Using collected data and building upon previous research, this study evaluated individual perceptions of multi-tasking in situational instances. Research results showed that the population is unaware of the detrimental effects of multi-tasking. The implications of these findings work against the myth that multi-tasking leads to a higher degree of efficiency and higher levels of productivity. Keywords: Multi-tasking, small business, ethics, dilemma, productivity Abstract
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The purpose of this study is to examine the ethical dilemma of multi-tasking faced by small business owners. With fewer resources than larger organizations, the concept of multi-tasking becomes appealing to small business owners. A moderate sample (N = 115) of college students and business men and women was generated from the state of Virginia. Using collected data and building upon previous research, this study evaluated individual perceptions of multi-tasking in situational instances. Research results showed that the population is unaware of the detrimental effects of multi-tasking. The implications of these findings work against the myth that multi-tasking leads to a higher degree of efficiency and higher levels of productivity. Introduction Multitasking has become commonplace in our culture; individuals live in the delusion that they can work, learn, and operate more efficiently if they are doing several things at once. The concepts of faster, harder, and more, have begun to replace the concepts of true efficiency, productivity, and overall quality. It would be foolish to suggest that multitasking at large should be eradicated; it is natural to chew gum while walking and to shift gears while driving a vehicle. Instead, this paper intends to identify multitasking as an intrinsic myth of which is both impractical and counterproductive. Because of its adverse effects, multitasking is looked at as an ethical dilemma of which small business owners’ face as they seek to maximize their scarce resources. Literature Review Running a small business can get overwhelming at points. Unlike larger organizations, small businesses simply do not have enough resources to hire a specific person for each specific task. Consequently, small business owners are faced with a 2
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dilemma: Is multitasking something that should be asked, or even required of employees? Research shows that multitasking has costly effects on employee well-being, the quality
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Multitasking - Ethical Dilemmas Small Busninesses Face -...

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