ANTH+41A+-+13+Jan+2009

ANTH+41A+-+13+Jan+2009 - Tuesday January 13 Whats the...

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Unformatted text preview: Tuesday, January 13 Whats the difference? how historians create or write history a construction of history a cultural practice a practice shaped by power and authority a practice that has real effects and ramifications So history writing is not the mere reporting of facts and dates All history writing involves a point of view or perspective. Only certain perspectives gain the force of truth that is, only certain perspectives are authorized (are backed by authority) telephone Mapping as an example Cold War map: which decade? What do they have in common? What can they tell us about historiography? Historiography:  Only certain perspectives of history gain the force of truth that is, only certain perspectives are authorized (are backed by authority) Perspectives on the issue of labor costs while debating the proposed bailout. The Big Three automakers are asking taxpayers to bail out some of the most highly paid workers in America. UAW workers earn $75 an hour in wages and benefits--The average private sector worker earned $25.36 an hour in 2006--$17.91 an hour in cash wages and $7.45 an hour in benefits such as pensions, paid time off, and health insurance. The typical UAW worker at the Big Three earned between $71 and $76 an hour in 2006. This amount is triple the earnings of the typical worker in the private sector and $25 to $30 an hour more than American workers at Japanese auto plants. The average unionized worker at the Big Three earns over $130,000 a year in wages and benefits. The Associated Press reported that, for example, the average United Auto Workers member makes $29.78 per hour at GM, while Toyota pays its workers (most of whom are non-union) about $30 per hour. However, when total benefits (including pensions and health care for workers, retirees and their spouses) is...
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ANTH+41A+-+13+Jan+2009 - Tuesday January 13 Whats the...

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