Electrical properties of nanotip-assisted microplasma devices

Electrical properties of nanotip-assisted microplasma devices

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Unformatted text preview: BRIEF REPORTS AND COMMENTS This section is intended for the publication of (1) brief reports which do not require the formal structure of regular journal articles, and (2) comments on items previously published in the journal. Electrical properties of nanotip-assisted microplasma devices Sung-O. Kim a ! Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Center for Optical Materials and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, 207-C Riggs Hall, P.O. Box 340915, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0915 Yang-Suk Ko Department of Mathematics, California State University at Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Highway, Bakersfield, California 93311 Hal-Bon Gu Department of Electrical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-757, Korea s Received 29 June 2007; accepted 10 November 2008; published 4 February 2009 d Nanotip-assisted microplasma devices have been fabricated and characterized in Ne, Ar, or Ne/2% Ar. The electrical properties of the glow discharge in three different environments, Ne, Ar, and Ne/2% Ar, have been examined with direct current s dc d bipolar-pulsed waveforms with frequencies from 2 to 20 kHz at pressures from 300 to 800 torr. The operating voltage of the nanotip-assisted microplasma devices was decreased around 10–20 V compared with devices without a nanotip electrode. The 6 3 1 cm panel-type microplasma device with nanotip electrodes revealed low discharge voltages around 300 V. © 2009 American Vacuum Society. f DOI: 10.1116/1.3043534 g I. INTRODUCTION Recent research for microdischarge devices that have been investigated in microcavity plasma devices and plasma displays exhibits the approaches to be applied to the next generation of glow-discharge devices. 1 – 4 Microplasma de- vices have stirred a great deal of interest due to their possible applications, such as liquid-crystal display backlighting and emitters. 5 – 11 Existing microplasma devices show the promise of being part of the next generation of plasma devices. In the case of microplasma devices with a Si wafer substrate which are operated in a vacuum chamber, it is hard to increase panel size to apply as a flat light source. Microcavity fabri- cation with the drilling method is difficult for making stable plasma and practical devices with large size and long life- time. And the conventional plasma-backlight systems for liquid-crystal display require more than 1 kV. This article describes nanotip-enhanced panel-type micro- plasma devices that are operated in Ne, Ar, and Ne/2% Ar gas mixtures and investigates the electrical characteristics of nanotip microplasma devices as a flat light source in dis- plays. II. EXPERIMENT The nanotips, with tip radii below 10 nm and a 30-nm-thick coated aluminum layer, are adhered on rear panel electrodes to enhance the local strength of the electri- cal field and improve the discharge voltages with a stable glow discharge. A Si wafer s 100 d polished on both sides with a 300 m m thickness was prepared as a start substrate. Ther-m thickness was prepared as a start substrate....
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This note was uploaded on 11/03/2010 for the course ECE 999 taught by Professor Sok during the Spring '10 term at Clemson.

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Electrical properties of nanotip-assisted microplasma devices

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