exam1notes - Fshn 120 Nutrition Chapter 1 The Role of...

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Fshn 120: Nutrition Chapter 1: The Role of Nutrition on Our Health Nutrition is the science of food and how food nourishes the body and impacts health. Nutrition is an important component of wellness, and healthful nutrition plays a critical role in eliminating nutritional deficiency disease and can help reduce our risks for various chronic diseases. Healthy People 2010 is a national health agenda that focuses on health promotion and disease prevention; its two primary goals are to increase quality and years of life and to eliminate health disparities in the US population. Healthy People 2010 includes numerous objectives categorized into twenty0eight focus areas that target factors including physical activity, overweight and obesity, tobacco use, and access to health care. Nutrients are chemicals found in food that are critical to human growth and function. The six essential nutrients found in the foods we eat are carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water. The nutrients that provide energy for our bodies are the macronutrients: carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Carbohydrates are composed of carbons, hydrogen, and oxygen. Carbohydrates are the primary energy source for our bodies, particularly our brains. Fats provide us with fat soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids in addition to storing large quantities of energy. Proteins can provide energy if needed, but they are not a primary fuel source. Proteins support tissue growth, repair, and maintenance. Vitamins assist with the regulation of body processes. Fat soluble vitamins are soluble in fat and can be stored in our tissues; these include vitamins A, D, E, and K. Water soluble vitamins are soluble in water, and we excrete excess amounts in our urine. These include vitamin C and the vitamin B (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B 6 . Vitamin B 12 , pantothenic acid, biotin, and folate). Minerals and inorganic substances that are not changed by digestion or other metabolic processes.
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Major minerals are found in our bodies in amounts greater than 5 grams, and we need to consume less than 100 mg of these minerals each day. Trace minerals are found in our bodies in amounts less than 5 grams, and we need to consume less than 100 mg of these minerals each day. Water is critical to support numerous body functions, including fluid balance, conduction of nervous impulses, and muscle contraction. The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) are reference standards for nutrient intakes for healthy people in the United States and Canada. The DRIs should be used for dietary planning for individuals and groups. The DRIs include the Estimated Average Requirement, the Recommended Dietary Allowance, the Adequate Intake, and the Tolerable Upper Intake Level. Potentially good sources of reliable nutrition information include individuals who are
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2010 for the course FSHN 120 taught by Professor Parker during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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exam1notes - Fshn 120 Nutrition Chapter 1 The Role of...

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