sinking titanic - The Sinking of the Titanic (1912)...

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The Sinking of the Titanic (1912) Statistical Analysis of the Survivors 1
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Contents Appendix A Analytical Methods…………………………………………………………Page 4-6 Charts………………….…………………………………………………. …Appendix B Conclusion……………………………………………………………………. . Page 7-8 Explanation of Research………………………………………………………Page 4-7 2
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Historical Information ………………………………………………………. .Appendix A Introduction…………………………………………………………………. Page 4 References/Works Cited…………………………………………………………………………. Page 9 Appendix A Historical Information According to the Titanic Historical Society, Inc (2001), The RMS Titanic was the largest passenger steamship in the world. On the night of 14 April 1912, during her maiden voyage , Titanic hit an iceberg and sank two hours and forty minutes later, early on 15 April 1912. The sinking resulted in the deaths of 1,517 people, making it one of the most deadly peacetime maritime disasters in history. The high casualty rate was due in part to the fact that, although complying with the regulations of the time, the ship did not carry enough lifeboats for everyone aboard. The ship had a total lifeboat capacity of 1,178 people even though her maximum capacity was 3,547 people. A disproportionate number of men died also, due to the women-and-children-first protocol that was followed. Abstract 3
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This paper is conducted in the fashion that of a research and analytical explanation based upon statistics. The concept of the project is centered on the premise of attempting to understand the survival rate of the passengers of the Titanic . Theories, historical information, perspectives, and other resources aid in the proposed hypotheses. After gathering information and the skills acquired in Applied Statistics class; we present our findings. Executive Summary The Titanic had a variety of passengers, each having different life circumstances (i.e. age, gender, economical class, etc). The survival rate of the passengers was not necessarily contingent upon one key determinant. Theories suggest that the survival rate was heavily based upon gender. Along with this idea, we are convinced that there were other key components that explain the survival rate. Our evidence supports our theories that survival rate was higher for passengers who were: women (female gender), wealthy, and under the age of 50. Historically,
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This note was uploaded on 11/03/2010 for the course STATISTIC GM533 taught by Professor Henry during the Spring '10 term at Keller Graduate School of Management.

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sinking titanic - The Sinking of the Titanic (1912)...

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