Act Three - Lesson Title Truth and Lies Contempt of...

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Lesson Title: Truth and Lies: Contempt of Court (Reading, Discussing Act Three) Course and Grade: American Literature, 11 th Generalization: The main idea here is that anyone who opposes the court is in danger of being accused of witchcraft, anyone accused is essentially helpless. Learning Targets: Facts: Proctor is willing to admit the whole truth (including his lechery) and his wife to lie (for the first time in her life) to attempt to protect him but in doing so, ironically, she condemns him; his efforts to get Mary Warren to tell the truth collapse under the pressure she feels to go along with the hysteria when all the other girls accuse her of bewitching them; when Proctor presents a petition with signatures of ninety-one people attesting to the good character of Giles Corey’s wife Martha and Francis Nurse’s wife Rebecca, Danforth issues warrants for the arrest of everyone who signed that petition; Giles Corey charges Putnam with using the hysteria (and his daughter) to get an accused person’s land, has a witness, but refuses to name that witness for fear of what would happen to that witness, and is thus arrested for contempt of court. Skills: 1.1c readily use a variety of strategies to comprehend words and ideas in complex texts including self-correcting, re-reading, reading-on, and slowing down 1.3 read fluently, adjusting reading for purpose and material 1.3b read at different speeds, using scanning and/or careful reading as appropriate 1.4c analyze literary elements (plot, characters, setting, theme, point of view, conflict, resolution) 2.2a critically compare, contrast, and connect ideas within and among a broad range of texts 2.3f analyze, interpret, and evaluate ideas and concepts within, among, and beyond multiple texts 2.3g analyze, interpret, and evaluate reasoning and ideas related to multiple texts 3.1d read, analyze, and interpret a full range of texts fluently (instructions, news articles, poetry, novels, short stories, professional-level materials that match career or academic interests, electronic information, etc.) Materials: Lesson plan w/ questions, copies of The Crucible , copy of the letter sent to man to call him in for questioning, story about refusals to sign petition for coffee machine, and for statement that contained nothing but quotations from Declaration of Independence, petitions.
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