End of Chapter 13

End of Chapter 13 - End of Chapter 13 Study Guide...

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End of Chapter 13 Study Guide Introduction • What defines a Jovian planet? [very large, low density; either a gas giant or an ice giant] • The Jovian planets have no hard surfaces, but 'blend' from atmosphere to either liquid or 'slush' layers defining surface. • Cores of Jovian planets are most silica-rich and high in heavy elements; normally we'd call that material 'rock'; cores tend to be very dense and very hot. • Jupiter has a large core and emits great heat from the core (which probably means it has a fairly high content of radioactive elements). Jupiter emits 1.7 times more heat than it receives (from Sun). • Easily distinguished from Earth; can also see 4 large satellites (The Galilean Moons; see later) • Bulk chemistry: remarkably similar to Sun • Because it grew so quickly (in the beginning days of planet growth), it is suggested that it almost became a small star itself (thus would make our Solar System a binary star system). In fact, a quick calculation shows it didn't really come close - just wild speculation! • Jupiter is so huge that pressures inside the planet are enormous - to the point of
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This note was uploaded on 11/01/2010 for the course EARTH SCIE 2010 taught by Professor Neil during the Fall '10 term at UWO.

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End of Chapter 13 - End of Chapter 13 Study Guide...

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