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07 Metabolic Control EXB101 F10

07 Metabolic Control EXB101 F10 - EXB 101 Exercise...

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EXB 101 Exercise Physiology Lecture 8 Metabolic Control
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Exercise Metabolism Exercise is one of the most powerful modulators of metabolism. Exercise metabolism obeys the need for increased energy supply to the contracting muscles. Most kinds of exercise cause increased breakdown of carbohydrates and lipids. Exercise changes metabolism not only in the exercising muscles but also in other tissues (such as the liver and adipose tissues).
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Exercise Metabolism Metabolism does not return to resting state immediately after the end of exercise. Many changes persist for hours or days, while others are manifest during recovery rather than exercise. Regular repetition of exercise- what we call training - can change metabolism to an extent great enough to make the metabolic profile of a trained individual (not only during exercise but also during rest) different from that of an untrained individuals.
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Exercise Parameters Three main identifying parameters of exercise are: Type Intensity Duration Three widely recognized types of exercise – Endurance – Resistance – Sprint
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Types of Exercise Endurance ( aerobic ) Prolonged continuous or intermittent periods of contractile activity against low resistance. Resistance ( anaerobic ) Short periods of contractile activity against high resistance Sprint ( anaerobic ) Short periods of maximal contractile activity against low resistance.
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Intensity of Exercise Can be exercise specific, for example, running speed, weight lifted, or More general, such as, heart rate or oxygen uptake Relative terms: percentage of maximal intensity Percentage of maximum VO 2 Up to 49%=light • 50-74%=moderate • >75%=heavy
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Acute vs. Chronic Exercise Exercise that is executed once is acute or short term.
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