Acid rain

Acid rain - Acid rain(more accurately acid precipitation...

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Acid rain (more accurately, acid precipitation) refers to a mixture of moist and dry materials that are emitted into the atmosphere and undergo chemical changes, and when united with water droplets in the air, become acidic. The emissions that cause acid rain can result from natural sources such as volcanic eruptions, forest fires and decaying vegetation. Unfortunately, the majority of acid rain pollutants are manmade. The most common cause of human-induced acid rain is the emission of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides from the combustion of fossil fuels. The major sources of the emissions are from electric power generators, ore smelting processes, processing of natural gas, vehicular exhaust, and residential and industrial furnaces. These pollutants are released into the atmosphere, react with water and oxygen and other chemicals and form acidic compounds. These compounds are absorbed by water droplets in the clouds. They then return to earth as rain, sleet, hail, or snow (precipitation).
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Acid rain - Acid rain(more accurately acid precipitation...

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