Sixteenth Lecture

Sixteenth Lecture - February 18, 2009 Philosophy 4:...

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February 18, 2009 Philosophy 4: Sixteenth Lecture Normative Ethics (An Introduction) Normative Ethics : the study and development of systems of right and wrong - Systems of rules, principles or procedures for figuring out what one should do and should not do (morally speaking) - Sample Normative Views: o Deontology o Utilitarianism o Virtue Theory o Divine Command The Central Concern: - The central concerns of normative ethics are two sets of concepts: o Right and Wrong Right and wrong are concepts that we apply to actions “Abortion is morally right” “Torture is always morally wrong” Three Types of Action: Obligatory: an action that one ought to perform Optional: an action that is neither obligatory nor wrong Wrong: an action that one ought not to perform Right Action : what does it mean to say that something is right or wrong? When we say that an action is “right” we can mean it in one of two ways: o The broad meaning of “right” includes actions that are both obligatory and optional (it essentially means you are not doing something wrong)
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Sixteenth Lecture - February 18, 2009 Philosophy 4:...

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