Twenty-Second Lecture

Twenty-Second Lecture - March 11, 2009 Philosophy:...

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March 11, 2009 Philosophy: Twenty-Second Lecture Deontology/Kant (Continued) The Moral Law is one of two different types of law: - Laws of Nature : (e.g. gravity, 2 nd law of thermodynamics, etc. – they don’t have exceptions) - Laws of Freedom : these are laws that rational people are supposed to be governed by (the key is that it is possible to violate this law) o Laws of freedom are called “imperatives” Hypothetical Imperatives – given to us in the form of an if/then statement (only apply to you so long as you want to achieve the goal) Categorical Imperatives – something that applies to you irrespective of what you want (don’t murder) About Laws of Freedom: - For Kant, m orality sp e aks to us categorically (not hypothetically). So the moral law is a categorical imperative - Stat ed different ways, but we will focus only on two: o The Universal Law Formulation o The Formula of Hum anity The two different ways of expressing th e on e m oral law Two points about the categorical imperative:
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2010 for the course PHIL PHIL 4 taught by Professor Huizenga during the Winter '09 term at UCSB.

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Twenty-Second Lecture - March 11, 2009 Philosophy:...

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