LS10 - NPB12 Lecture 10 Pain: a subjective experience...

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NPB12 Lecture 10
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Pain: a subjective experience tough guys other guys Nociception: The perception of a stimulus that, if continued, will cause tissue damage. Nociceptor: A receptor that ultimately leads to nociception.
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Intralaminar nuclei of the ventral posterior nucleus of the thalamus Pain and temperature pathway
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Very large myelinated axons A-alpha: ventral motor neurons and Golgi tendon organs. Large myelinated axons Beta: RA, SA and PC neurons. small myelinated axons delta: temperature and fast pain. small unmyelinated axons C: slow pain.
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S1 projects to the other somatosensory areas and is used to localize where the nociceptive stimuli are coming from. Limbic areas and frontal lobes control the “affect” of the person and the emotional quality of the pain. PAG (periaqueductal gray), “slow” pain pathway How can stop pain?
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Dr. Walter Freeman The “ice pick” lobotomy Lobotomy: eliminating the input and output of the frontal lobe
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stereotaxic neurosurgery radiosurgery Modern Psychosurgery:
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Opiates affect the pain pathway and overall decrease the activity of neurons providing input about nociceptive stimuli.
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Opiates act the same way on the neuron, the difference is in how well they bind to the opiate receptor and how well they get into the brain. Codeine, morphine, heroine, “good stuff” all work the same once they get to
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LS10 - NPB12 Lecture 10 Pain: a subjective experience...

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