Lecture5--Vision

Lecture5--Vision - 10/6/10 LECTURE OUTLINE CHAPTER 4:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
10/6/10 1 C HAPTER 4: SENSATION AND PERCEPTION Lecture 5: An Intro to Sensation & Perception (p. 152-159); Vision (p. 163-176) L ECTURE OUTLINE An introduction to sensation and perception Vision Principles of perception (part 1) A N INTRODUCTION TO SENSATION AND PERCEPTION S ENSATION & PERCEPTION Sensation Detection of physical energy by sense organs Information sent to the brain How? N EURON REVIEW Sensory Interneurons Motor How does the information get into the sensory neurons? Our senses! Makes sense O UR 5 SENSES ? Vision Audition (hearing) Chemical senses Olfaction (smell) Gustation (taste) Body senses Somatosensory (Touch, temperature and pain) Proprioception (Body position) Vestibular (Equilibrium)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10/6/10 2 L INKS TO THE N ERVOUS S YSTEM Thalamus Sensory relay station/ gateway to cortex Except smell Contralateral connections Right side of body Left hemisphere Left side of body Right hemisphere S ENSORY C ORTEX Smell Tast e Remember: The brain works in action potentials A STIMULUS BECOMES AN ACTION POTENTIAL Via transduction The process of converting the external energy of a stimulus into neural activity Transduction is done by sense receptors Specialized cells for each sense E.g. Vision=photoreceptors Physical energy signals (stimulus) Electrical energy signals (action potentials) T RANSDUCTION R EVIEW C HANGE IS GOOD Sensory adaptation A decline in activation within a sense receptor after initial activation Our senses love variation And it helps us to conserve energy and resources! S ENSATION & PERCEPTION Sensation Detection of physical energy by sense organs Information sent to the brain How? Sensory input has no meaning on its own Perception The brain’s interpretation of raw sensory inputs Processing, organization, and interpretation of sensory signals Assembly of signals into a meaningful mental representation of stimulus
Background image of page 2
10/6/10 3 SENSATION VERSUS PERCEPTION FROM SENSATION TO PERCEPTION 1. Stimulus 2. Sensation 3. Sensory Coding 4. Perception A green light emits physical properties in the form of protons (light waves). Sensory receptors in the driver’s eyes detect this stimulus. The stimulus is transduced. The driver’s brain processes the neural signals and constructs the representation as a green light. Green Means Go! VISION VISUAL INPUT: LET THERE LIGHT Light waves L ET THERE BE LIGHT Light waves Brightness (the intensity of the reflected light that reaches our eyes) is determined by the wave’s amplitude (height) Quantitative coding Rate of action potentials L ET THERE BE LIGHT Light waves Brightness (the intensity of the reflected light that reaches our eyes) is determined by the wave’s amplitude (height) Hue (color) is determined by wavelength Distance from one peak to the next Qualitative coding Different receptors activated
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/08/2010 for the course PSC PSC 001 taught by Professor Paoli during the Fall '09 term at UC Davis.

Page1 / 14

Lecture5--Vision - 10/6/10 LECTURE OUTLINE CHAPTER 4:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online