Lecture 12 - Lecture 12 The frontier and western history -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 12 – The frontier and western history - outline Blackboard 1) Limerick: The Legacy of Conquest 2) Limerick, Milner and Rankin eds.: Trails: Toward a New Western History 3) Frederick Jackson Turner, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History.” Today 1) American territorial expansion and settlement 2) European Am ideas and myths of the frontier and the American West more broadly Territorial expansion and settlement American myth and the frontier Myth represents a charter for social order and makes sense of everyday experience Ideological function: rationalize the position of different groups of people in society The frontier is viewed as barbarism-very wild The frontier as crude outback (17th-18th centuries) - Trans Appalachian west, uncivilized west, high level of freedom and cooperation Settlers = backwoodsman / frontiersmen Not seen in a positive light, culturally/genetically impured for having mixed with Indians (melting pot) Unproductive, outside of civilization, a decline of American values Whites choosing voluntary separation Uncivilized society Mixing with Indians – cultural and genetic Production outside of eastern seaboard economy
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/03/2010 for the course ESPM 50AC taught by Professor Spreyer during the Spring '09 term at Berkeley.

Page1 / 5

Lecture 12 - Lecture 12 The frontier and western history -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online