Notes from Biology

Notes from Biology - Talked about respiration today: carbon...

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Talked about respiration today: carbon dioxide is a deciding factor for respiratory rate, not oxygen - A higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood increases the respiratory rate (resulting in hyperventilation). This is done to excrete the excess carbon dioxide in the blood. Hyperventilation results in a lower than normal PCO2, and a higher than normal plasma pH. - A lower PCO2 would cause hypoventilation : this would be accompanied by high pH (i.e. low hydrogen concentration). - A high PCO2 would imply a lower pH. Keep in mind the following equation (catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase): CO2 + H2O H2CO3 H+ + HCO3- Respiration is controlled by the medulla oblongata; the cerebellum is responsible for coordination, and the pons for balance. The diencephalon is the thalamus and hypothalamus, and is involved in sensory relay. At higher altitudes, there is a lower partial pressure of oxygen (implying a high pH in the blood) Be aware of shifts in the oxygen dissociation curve for hemoglobin: a right-shift implies that hemoglobin has a lower affinity for oxygen, and distributes it to the tissues more (tense configuration). A left-shift implies that hemoglobin has a higher affinity for oxygen (is in the
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Notes from Biology - Talked about respiration today: carbon...

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