Gases - Gases are far more compressible than solids or...

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Gases are far more compressible than solids or liquids, and their densities are low . - Recall: gases are usually not soluble in liquids with an increase in temperature unless there is an increase in pressure. Reason? gases will increase their entropy if they are in the vapor state: in water, they will want to vaporize with the increase in temperature (unless there is pressure exerted on the walls of the container, keeping the gas inside the container) All collisions of gaseous molecules are elastic KE is the same after the collision as it was before - KE α Temperature Ideal gas : gas molecules themselves take up essentially no volume, experience no intermolecular forces, and their KE’s are proportional to the temperature of the system. If these conditions are met, then the following equation can be used to measure pressure, temperature and volume: PV = nRT - A fancy way of saying this: P 1 V 1 T 2 = P 2 V 2 T 1 - Variations of this law give us Charles’ law, boyle’s law, etc. - They’ll frequently say, “At constant pressure” or “at constant temperature” or “at constant volume”
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2010 for the course CBN 356 taught by Professor Merill during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Gases - Gases are far more compressible than solids or...

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