lect03_S07 - Making Lecture 3 Preview We continue our...

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M aking Things Open-Ended Problem Solving II Engineering 100 J. Daida Standard Disclaimer: These lecture notes are provided as a SERVICE to you to help you study for this class. At no time are we obligated to provide notes for every lecture. Understand that these notes are NOT a replacement for either coming to lecture or for the class readings. Indeed, these notes represent only a PARTIAL SET, which means it's up to you to attend class (or to find someone else's notes) to fill in the SUBSTANTIAL fraction of the lecture that has been left out of these notes. Indeed, these notes may represent only a draft and may be based on last term's lectures (which may or may not be repeated in their entirety for this term.) If it turns out that attendance to the class drops below 80%, we reserve the right to reduce the amount of content in these notes. If it turns out that attendance to the class drops below 80%, we also reserve the right to discontinue the distribution of these notes either before or after lecture. Copyright: © 2007, Jason M Daida. All Rights Reserved. Lecture 3 Preview ± Short Review of Previous Lectures ± Changing Frame of Reference ± Methods of Managing Detail When Exploring – Black boxes – Component Relationship Diagrams – Concept Maps ± Conclusions We continue our examination of what it means to be in the room “Exploring: Creating an Internal Map of a Problem.” We’ll specifically cover other techniques for concretization and abstraction. A look back at Lecture2 Engineering Design in the Real World Your U-M counterparts faired less than stellar, too ± Stats (out of 102 persons) – 0 right, 85 persons – 1 right, 14 persons – 2 right, 3 persons – 3 right, 0 persons ± This happened in spite of the the “obvious” nature of at least 2 of these problems Concretization and Abstraction ± Abstraction highlights certain attributes of concrete entity The Trick… ± … is in deciding a level of abstraction / concretization that’s useful Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs , 1965.
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The Trick… ± How we go about deciding a level of abstraction / concretization that’s useful will be covered in the next lecture… Where we left off… ± We were specifically looking at the “room” called “Exploring: Creating an Internal Idea of a Problem” Engage Define Stated Problem Create Internal Idea of Problem Plan a Solution Carry Out The Plan Evaluate Look Back Frames ± Sub-problems can be generated and organized by a way of a “frame,” a way of looking and perceiving a problem – What details do I keep? – What details do I throw out? – What assumptions am I making? – Are my assumptions correct? ± Each “frame” has its own (self-consistent) set of assumptions Frames… Application (Back to the matchsticks) We return to the matchstick problem ± Where the solution “hides” in plain view – Change the frame of reference: instead of using sticks, write down and list everything that you know about squares How does this list compare with your assumptions?
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2010 for the course ME 100 taught by Professor Jasondaida during the Fall '07 term at University of Michigan.

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lect03_S07 - Making Lecture 3 Preview We continue our...

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