chapter 30 - Chapter 30 Forgetting, Memory Construction,...

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Chapter 30 Forgetting, Memory Construction, and Improving Memory - Three sins of forgetting o Absent-mindedness- inattention to details leads to encoding failure o Transience- storage decay over time o Blocking- inaccessibility of stored information (seeing an old actor in an old movie, we feel the name on the tip of our tongue, but experience retrieval failure—we cannot get it out) - Three sins of distortion: o Misattribution: confusing the source of information o Suggestibility: lingering effects of misinformation o Bias: belief coloured recollections (current feelings toward a friend may colour our recalled initial feelings) - One sin of intrusion: o Persistence- unwanted memories (images of being sexually assaulted, etc) - Encoding failure o What we fail to encode we will never remember o Slower encoding in older adults help explain age related memory decline o No matter how young we are, We selectively attend to few of the myriad sights and sounds continually bombarding us o We encode things such as where we had dinner yesterday automatically, however, encoding other types of info such as the info in this module requires effortful processing Without effortful processing, memories would never form
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Chapter 30 Forgetting, Memory Construction, and Improving Memory - Storage decay o Even after encoding something well, we later may forget it o Ebbinhaus did an experiment where he learned nonsensical words and measured how much he retained when relearning each list from 20 minutes to 30 days later. ... Course of forgetting is initially rapid, but levels off with time Explanation is gradual fading of the physical memory trace o Memories also fade for reasons such as accumulation of learning that disrupts our retrieval
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2010 for the course PSYCH PSYCH101 taught by Professor John during the Fall '09 term at Waterloo.

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chapter 30 - Chapter 30 Forgetting, Memory Construction,...

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