JenniferJohnson296-CM105-02-Unit 7- The Glass Ceiling and Women in the Workplace[2]

JenniferJohnson296-CM105-02-Unit 7- The Glass Ceiling and Women in the Workplace[2]

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Unit 7 Project 1 Running Head: UNIT 7 PROJECT Unit 7 Project: “The Glass Ceiling and Women in the Workplace” Jennifer Johnson Kaplan University CM105-O2 Rathi Krishnana June 16, 2010
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Unit 7 Project 2 “The Glass Ceiling and Women in the Workplace” Women are very prevalent in most companies within today’s society. It is interesting, however, to glance back a mere fifty years ago to when a woman in a management position was unheard of. Even in today’s society, only seven to nine percent of women have managed to break through the “glass ceiling” and reach the position of senior management (Catalyst Corporation, 1999). The “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe the invisible barriers that prevent women from advancing to management positions within corporations. This phrase was coined in 1986 when the Wall Street Journal wrote an article describing the unseen barriers that women encounter as they approach the top of the corporate hierarchy (Dunn, 1997). Throughout the past fifty years, the determination of women has helped in chipping away at the glass ceiling to overcome discrimination, exclusion from business related networking, and business politics. Any person can be the object of discrimination and women have had to overcome social perception, race, and gender in order to compete with men. Although women have the law on their side when it comes to equality in the workplace, they still face the “glass ceiling” and the social perceptions of working women (Gleeson, 2010). Over fifty years ago, it was believed that the workplace was a man’s world to thrive while women belonged at home with the family. Even today, women have to overcome these misperceptions in order to make their way to management positions in many corporations. Women, especially African Americans, even have to work twice as hard to reach the same positions or pay as men. The U.S. Department of Labor Report
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2010 for the course CM105 CM105 taught by Professor Rathikrishnana during the Fall '10 term at Kaplan University.

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JenniferJohnson296-CM105-02-Unit 7- The Glass Ceiling and Women in the Workplace[2]

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