BLAWExam3 - Contracts 08/10/200807:59:00 Substantivelaw

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Contracts 08/10/2008 07:59:00 Substantive law Generally, governed by common law Unless a statute or regulation changes common law Definition Promise(s) Breach = remedy Performance = duty Short definition o Legally binding agreement between parties 4 Requirements of a Valid K Agreement, including offer and acceptance Consideration Capacity Legality Ways to not have a K (defenses) Lack of assent (agreement) Wrong form (not written where law requires it) Parties in the K Offeror – makes the offer Offeree – has power to accept the offer
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Promisor – makes a promise Promissee – a promise is made to him/her Terms to Describe Ks Unilateral – accept offer by performing o Promise for action o K formed when the action is completed o Examples Lottery Contest Walk across the bridge o *watch out for revocation of offer after performance has begun.  The  offeror cannot validly revoke his offer after performance has  begun Bilateral – accept offer by promising to perform o Promise for promise o K formed when the return promise is made o Example Buy a house Buy a car Get a student loan Express – agreement is stated in words or writing o Look at the agreement Implied-in-fact – agreement is not stated but is implied from the conduct of the  parties
Background image of page 2
o Look for one party doing something that he expected to be paid for,  and the other party knew or should know he expected to get paid for it  and didn’t stop the first guy from doing the thing or tell him “I’m not  paying you.” Executed – K has been fully performed by all parties Executory – K has not been fully performed by all parties Valid – has all requirements listed above Unenforceable – valid K but legal defenses exist o Examples Writing SOL passed Voidable – a party has the option to decide to cancel the K o Examples Minors Fraud Duress Undue influence Void – oxymoron – no K was ever formed o Examples K for murder One party lacked capacity Objective theory Is used to decide if there is a K Determined by the objective intent of the party
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Not the subjective intent of the party Reasonable person standard Quasi Contract Equitable concept No real K was made Created by courts To prevent unjust enrichment of one party Quantum Meruit  – as much as he deserves Plain Meaning Rule If the words are clear and unambiguous, the court decides what the  agreement was from the document only If the words are not clear and unambiguous, the court can look at other 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/07/2010 for the course BLAW 3311 taught by Professor Boykin during the Fall '07 term at UT Arlington.

Page1 / 12

BLAWExam3 - Contracts 08/10/200807:59:00 Substantivelaw

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online