Lecture22 - Energy Examples Serway and Jewett 8.1 8.3 Physics 1D03 Lecture 22 Conservative Forces path 1 A force is called conservative if the work

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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 22 Energy Examples Serway and Jewett 8.1 – 8.3
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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 22 Conservative Forces A force is called “conservative” if the work done (in going from some point A to B) is the same for all paths from A to B. An equivalent definition: For a conservative force, the work done on any closed path is zero. Later you’ll see this written as: Total work is zero. path 1 path 2 A B W 1 = W 2
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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 22 If only conservative forces do work, potential energy is converted into kinetic energy or vice versa, leaving the total constant. Define the mechanical energy E as the sum of kinetic and potential energy: E K + U = K + U g + U s + ... Conservative forces only: W = -∆ U Work-energy theorem: W = K So: K +∆ U = 0 Conservation of mechanical energy
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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 22 Concept Quiz You drop two rocks from top of a building. One has mass m and the other mass 2m . When they hit the ground A) they have the same speed and same kinetic energy
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2010 for the course PHYSICS PHYSICS 1D taught by Professor Mckay during the Spring '09 term at McMaster University.

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Lecture22 - Energy Examples Serway and Jewett 8.1 8.3 Physics 1D03 Lecture 22 Conservative Forces path 1 A force is called conservative if the work

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