lecture31 - Oscillatory Motion Serway (Chap.15) Motion in...

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Unformatted text preview: Oscillatory Motion Serway (Chap.15) Motion in the real world may not fit some of our earlier models (linear or circular motion, uniform acceleration). Many phenomena are repetitive or oscillatory . Example: Block and spring M Oscillatory Motion M Equilibrium: no net force M The spring force is always directed back towards equilibrium. This leads to an oscillation of the block about the equilibrium position. M For an ideal spring, the force is proportional to displacement . For this particular force behaviour, the oscillation is simple harmonic motion. x F = -kx Simple Harmonic Motion t x ( t ) t A t x cos ) ( = In Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM), the displacement is a sinusoidal function of time, e.g., : t A t x sin ) ( = or Questions : Is a bouncing ball described by SHM, even if it returns to the same height? Is it periodic motion? t x ( t ) Three constants specify the motion are: 1) Amplitude, A 2) Angular Frequency, 3) Initial phase (or phase constant), ) cos( ) ( + =...
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2010 for the course PHYSICS PHYSICS 1D taught by Professor Mckay during the Spring '09 term at McMaster University.

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lecture31 - Oscillatory Motion Serway (Chap.15) Motion in...

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