Homework1_key-1 - Written Homework #1 Key NATS 101, Sec. 13...

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Written Homework #1 Key NATS 101, Sec. 13 Fall 2010 40 Points total 10 points per graded question 10 points for attempting all questions. 1. What is the difference between mass and weight? Mass is an intrinsic property of a substance that is the same regardless of location. Weight is the force of an object due to gravitational acceleration (mass of an object multiplied by gravitational acceleration). Thus, the weight of an object can vary depending on the gravitational acceleration at a given location. 2. What does a mercury barometer measure? Describe this device and explain how it physically works. Barometers measure air pressure. A mercury barometer consists of a long, vertical tube partially filled with mercury. At the top end, the tube is sealed and is a vacuum. At the bottom end of the tube, the mercury is exposed to air. The weight of the column of mercury is opposed by the pressure of air on openings at the base of the instrument. Changes in air pressure will result in increasing or decreasing mercury column height in the tube, which can then be measured. 3. Describe how atmospheric temperature changes going vertically upward toward outer space. How do these changes related to the various levels of the atmospheres (i.e. the ±spheres²) and the atmospheric lapse rate? The levels of the atmosphere are defined by whether or not the atmospheric temperature is increasing or decreasing with height, or the atmospheric lapse rate. Troposphere (surface to 10 km): Temperature decreases with height troposphere decreases to Stratosphere (10 km to 50 km): Temperature increases with height (due to UV absorption by ozone). Mesosphere (50 km to 90 km): Temperature decreases with height Thermosphere (90 km to 500 km): Temperature increases with height (due to ionization of gases). Exosphere (beyond 500 km): Basically outer space.
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4. Given that mean sea level pressure is defined to be 1013 mb, what would the air pressure be at the top of Mt. McKinley (Denali) in Alaska, the tallest point on the North American continent at 6194 m? Show your work. Using the equation for pressure variation as an exponentially decaying function of height, as
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Homework1_key-1 - Written Homework #1 Key NATS 101, Sec. 13...

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