N4325 Importance of early recognition with Pediatric Sepsis.docx - Running head RECOGNIZING SEPSIS EARLY RECOGNIZING SEPSIS EARLY1 Importance of early

N4325 Importance of early recognition with Pediatric Sepsis.docx

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 7 pages.

RECOGNIZING SEPSIS EARLY Running head: RECOGNIZING SEPSIS EARLY Importance of early recognition with Pediatric Sepsis Marcela San Martin RN The University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing In partial fulfillment of the requirements of Cauble, Denise PhD, RN, CWOCN February 7, 2018 RN-BSN Program 1
RECOGNIZING SEPSIS EARLY Sepsis a systemic infection, occurs when the body’s immune system does not recognize an infection which can lead to tissue damage within the body and causes the patient to become symptomatic. The sepsis scale ranges from simple sepsis, which can then progress quickly into septic shock. Without timely and appropriate intervention sepsis can eventually lead to death. Education is vital so that nurses understand what causes sepsis. Early symptoms of sepsis are subtle and often missed. Identification of early sepsis is important for improving patient outcomes. According to Patton & Young (2017), the mortality rate of children with severe sepsis and septic shock is estimated between 2 and 10% in industrialized countries, whereas mortality in developing countries is reported as high as 50% (Patton & Young, 2017, pp. 1-2). In the U.S, pediatric sepsis expends substantial healthcare resources with a total annual hospital cost of $1.7 billion dollars. Sepsis kills approximately 6 million neonates and children yearly; the World Health Organization statistics show that 80% of deaths in children less than four years may be related to sepsis. Worldwide sepsis remains a significant challenge, with children continuing to die every day, making the recognition and treatment of sepsis a high priority (Patton & Young, 2017, pp. 1-2). Nurses are in a position to identify clinical changes in a patient that signal sepsis. As stated by (Patton & Young, 2017), sepsis in children can be a challenge to recognize because of the indirect signs and symptoms that they present with along with their ability to compensate (Patton & Young, 2017, p. 2). The PICO question which guided my research was “Does the knowledge and or experience level of a nurse affect the ability to recognize when a pediatric patient is becoming septic, and intervening appropriately in a timely manner influence the patient’s outcome?”. According to (Jeffrey, Mutsch, & Knapp, 2014). It’s apparent there is a significant knowledge deficit amongst nurses that requires immediate attention to prevent an increase in 2
RECOGNIZING SEPSIS EARLY mortality rates amongst the pediatric community. Pediatric sepsis has the potential to have a high mortality rate if it progresses into septic shock, however if recognized in its initial phases outcomes can be significantly improved (Jeffrey, Mutsch, & Knapp, 2014). While most nurses

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture