2010F - CHEM 126101 Chapter 17 Basic Homework Thermodynamics I

2010F - CHEM 126101 Chapter 17 Basic Homework Thermodynamics I

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10F - CHEM 126101 - GEN CHEMISTRY II You are logged in as Andrew Sindt ( Logout ) You are here NJIT / ► 2010F - CHEM 126101 / ► Quizzes / ► Chapter 17 Basic Homework: Thermodynamics I / ► Review of attempt 3 Chapter 17 Basic Homework: Thermodynamics I Review of attempt 3 Started on Saturday, 23 October 2010, 11:45 PM Completed on Saturday, 23 October 2010, 11:50 PM Time taken 4 mins 6 secs Finish review
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Marks 19/20 Grade 6.65 out of a maximum of 7 ( 95 %) Question 1 Marks: 1 How much energy in kJ is required to heat a calorimeter whose heat capacity is 290.3 J/ o C from 23.5 o C to 75.7 o C? Heat capacity calculation Answer: Don't forget to change to kJ. Correct Marks for this submission: 1/1. Question 2 Marks: 1 What is the heat capacity of a calorimeter in J/ o C if 746.5 J of heat raises its temperature by 8.2 o C? Answer: Correct Marks for this submission: 1/1. Question 3 Marks: 1 What is the heat capacity of 0.76 kg of water in J/ o C? The specific heat of water is 4.184 J/(g o C). Specific heat definition and example Answer: Correct Marks for this submission: 1/1. Question 4 Marks: 1 The specific heat of iron is 0.45 J/(g o C). How much heat in J is added to a 5.52 g iron nail to raise its temperature from 22 o C to 460.0 o C? Specific heat 2nd example Answer: Correct Marks for this submission: 1/1. Question 5 Marks: 1 A bowl of 588 g of water is placed in a microwave oven that puts out 602 watts (J/s). How long would it take in seconds to increase the temperature of the water from 12.0 o C to 42.9 o C? Help given in feedback.
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Answer: 1. Find how many J are needed. 2. Convert J to sec. For example, suppose the microwave puts out 500 watts that is 500 J/s. To convert J to s do you multiple by (500 J)/s or 1 s/(500 J)? Correct Marks for this submission: 1/1. Question 6
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2010 for the course CHEM Chem taught by Professor Petrova during the Spring '09 term at NJIT.

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2010F - CHEM 126101 Chapter 17 Basic Homework Thermodynamics I

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