Week 7 Checkpoint - The Official Language Movement

Week 7 Checkpoint- - The Official Language Movement 1 The Official Language Movement Melissa Krol ETH 125 Instructor Joyce Hosier Axia College or

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Official Language Movement 1 The Official Language Movement Melissa Krol ETH 125 March 11, 2010 Instructor: Joyce Hosier Axia College or University of Phoenix
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Official Language Movement 2 The Official Language Movement Racial and Ethnic Groups Bilingualism is the use of two or more languages in education facilities or places of work. Bilingual education instructs children in their native language while gradually introducing the student to the language of dominant society” (Schaefer, 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc.). This approach to teaching is called an ELS (English as a second language) program and is designed to allow students to learn in their own language while learning a second. These programs tend to be bilingual but not bicultural (Schaefer, 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc.). “Until the last 20 or 30 years there was a conscious effort to devalue the Spanish language and to discourage Hispanics from using it in schools (Schaefer, 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc., p.242). In the 1960’s school boards in the Southwest, Florida, and New York City enforced a “No Spanish” rule and teaching in any language other than English was illegal from 1855 to 1968 (Schaefer, 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc.). Some Latino parents believe that English only education, even for the youngest children, is the key to success (Schaefer, 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc.). Most U.S. Citizens are apposed to more than one language being used in schools and government. Many have declared that English is the official language and that is the only language that should be used in schools and any government business, such as voting ballots (Schaefer, 2006 by Pearson Education, Inc.). But because of the growing Latino population many politicians support bilingualism in both
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/09/2010 for the course ETH/125 eth/125 taught by Professor Unk during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 6

Week 7 Checkpoint- - The Official Language Movement 1 The Official Language Movement Melissa Krol ETH 125 Instructor Joyce Hosier Axia College or

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online