Psych 2000-Intelligence Modules 33-34

Psych 2000-Intelligence Modules 33-34 - INTELLIGENCE:PART1...

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INTELLIGENCE: PART 1 PSYC 2000
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TOPICS Module 33: Introduction to Intelligence Module 34: Assessing Intelligence
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INTRODUCTION TO  INTELLIGENCE Module 33
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INTELLIGENCE The ability to learn from experience, solve problems, and  use knowledge to adapt to new situations IQ—a score once obtained on a particular intelligence  test It’s a concept, not a “thing” In research studies,  intelligence  is whatever the  intelligence test measures. This tends to be “school  smarts.”
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INTELLIGENCE But—Is intelligence a  single overall ability or  is it several specific  abilities? Disagreement among  psychologists
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GENERAL INTELLIGENCE: G  FACTOR Spearman proposed that  general intelligence (g)  underlies various types of intelligence. He noted that high scores on separate tests tend to  correlate with each other. Example, people who do well on vocabulary examinations  do well on paragraph comprehension examinations, a  cluster that helps define  verbal intelligence Other factors include a  spatial ability  factor, or a  reasoning ability  factor
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PRIMARY MENTAL ABILITIES L. L. Thurstone, a critic of Spearman, analyzed his subjects NOT on a single scale of general intelligence, but on seven clusters of primary mental abilities , including: 1. Word Fluency 2. Verbal Comprehension 3. Spatial Ability 4. Perceptual Speed 5. Numerical Ability 6. Inductive Reasoning 7. Memory Later psychologists analyzed Thurstone’s data and found a weak relationship between these clusters, suggesting some evidence of a g factor.
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THEORY OF MULTIPLE  INTELLIGENCES Howard Gardner proposes  eight types  of intelligences Brain damage may diminish one type of ability but not  others ( savant syndrome )
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THEORY OF MULTIPLE  INTELLIGENCES Sternberg (1985, 1999, 2003) suggests  three  intelligences  rather than eight. 1.
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2010 for the course PSYC 2000 taught by Professor Munson during the Fall '10 term at LSU.

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Psych 2000-Intelligence Modules 33-34 - INTELLIGENCE:PART1...

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