MCB124 Lecture5

MCB124 Lecture5 - How do We See Structures MCB 124...

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MCB 124 How do We See Structures?
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MCB 124 Experimental Methods Imaging Methods 1. Optical Microscopes 2. Scanning Probe Microscopes 3. Electron Microscopes Diffraction Methods 1. X-rays 2. Electrons Spectroscopic Methods 1. NMR 2. Mass Spectrometry Usually use multiple methods in combination to solve the most complex structures
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MCB 124 Optical Microscopy Anton van Leeuwenhoek generally credited with bringing forward the use of microscopes Oldest image by Francesco Stelluti in 1630
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MCB 124 Basic Optical Lens Concepts Important Features: Optic Axis Collection semi-angles α,β typically ~10mrad
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MCB 124 Basic Optical Lens Concepts (2) Position of Image Determined by Ray Diagram
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MCB 124 Basic Optical Lens Concepts (3) f v u 1 1 1 = + u v M =
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MCB 124 Definition of Magnification Control magnification through the position of the object and the strength of the lens u v M =
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MCB 124 Definition of Focus
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MCB 124 Depth of Field and Focus ob ob ob d D β = 2 M d D ob ob im =
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MCB 124 Rayleigh Criterion Rayleigh Criterion Can We See Atoms ? 1.22 d λ θ= For atoms separated by 1nm λ ~ 0.01 nanometers d θ λ 100 nm Not with optical light, but using wave-particle duality we can with electrons (see later lectures
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MCB 124 Resolution Limits for an Optical Microscope Imaging in higher refractive index medium can help = NA d 2 22 . 1 λ NA is the numerical aperture Davidson & Abramowitz, Optical Microscopy
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2010 for the course MCB 124 taught by Professor Baldwin during the Fall '09 term at UC Davis.

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MCB124 Lecture5 - How do We See Structures MCB 124...

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