Lecture 3.F10

Lecture 3.F10 - Neuroscience 106: Lecture 3 - Resting...

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Neuroscience 106: Lecture 3 - Resting Membrane Potential ASSIGNMENTS: In Bear et al. study Chapter 3. TODAY'S LECTURE: The Resting Membrane Potential (RMP) I. The Resting Membrane Potential (RMP) A. The RMP is typically given as ~ -65 millivolts (mV). However, different classes of neurons have characteristically different RMPs (-65 mV is an average and a convenient number to use). B. The RMP provides a baseline against which signals are produced (like the null state). The figure below shows the effects on RMP of injecting positive or negative ions into a neuron. The voltage across the membrane always reflects the difference between the net – and + charges inside the neuron compared to the net – and + charges outside the neuron. However, a small flux of ions can produce large changes in membrane potential, and 1 Oscilloscope recording membrane voltage Neuron 0 mV - 65 mV Insert Electrode Injecting – ions causes Hyperpolarization - 65 mV Resting Membrane Potential Time (msec) Injecting + ions causes Depolarization
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major changes in membrane voltage can be produced with small changes in the concentration of ions. As used in neuroscience Depolarization means - the membrane voltage becomes more positive. As used in neuroscience Hyperpolarization means - the membrane voltage becomes more negative.
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2010 for the course CBNS 106 taught by Professor Korzus during the Fall '08 term at UC Riverside.

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Lecture 3.F10 - Neuroscience 106: Lecture 3 - Resting...

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