Lecture 13.F10

Lecture 13.F10 - Neuroscience 106: Lecture 13 - The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Neuroscience 106: Lecture 13 - The Superior Colliculus and Primary Visual Cortex Assignments : Read Zeki, The Visual Image in Mind and Brain (in Reader). In Bear et al. understand figure 10.5. TODAY'S LECTURE: The Visual System I. The role of the superior colliculus in the visual system A. The superior colliculus acts as a tracking mechanism; it points the eyes and head toward a visual object. B. Below is a diagram depicting the superior colliculus and its inputs from the retina: 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. Neurons in the anterior portion of the superior colliculus respond to a visual image on the center of gaze from both eyes (but only from the contralateral visual field). 2. Neurons in the posterior portion of the superior colliculus respond to a visual image in the periphery of the visual field on the contralateral side. 3. Neurons in the center portion (at B) in the superior colliculus receive synaptic input from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from both eyes that respond to light at position B in the contralateral visual field. A B C D E F B C D B D C E F E A C B A D E F Superior Colliculus Eyes/Retinas Your Visual Field Optic nerve Optic chiasm Optic tract 2
Background image of page 2
4. This anatomical pattern of connections is the mechanism for generation of retinotopic maps in the superior colliculus. (See Figure 10.7). C. Below is a cross section diagram of the superior colliculus showing how visual, auditory, somatosensory and motor maps are aligned with each other: 1. Neurons in different layers in the superior colliculus respond to input from different sensory modalities: visual, auditory, and somatosensory. 2. Each layer contains a map of a particular sensory modality, and these maps are all aligned (or in register) with each other. 3. The motor layer contains motor neurons, not sensory neurons. Stimulating neurons at position B in the motor layer of the superior colliculus causes the head and eyes to move to look towards location B in the visual field. C
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

Lecture 13.F10 - Neuroscience 106: Lecture 13 - The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online