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Module-1_Lesson-2 - 1 Fundamentals of machine design...

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Version 2 ME, IIT Kharagpur Module 1 Fundamentals of machine design
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Version 2 ME, IIT Kharagpur Lesson 2 Engineering Materials
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Version 2 ME, IIT Kharagpur Instructional Objectives At the end of this lesson, students should know Properties and applications of common engineering materials. Types and uses of ferrous metals such as cast iron, wrought iron and steel. Types and uses of some common non-ferrous metals. Types and uses of some non-metals. Important mechanical properties of materials. 1.2.1 Introduction Choice of materials for a machine element depends very much on its properties, cost, availability and such other factors. It is therefore important to have some idea of the common engineering materials and their properties before learning the details of design procedure. This topic is in the domain of material science or metallurgy but some relevant discussions are necessary at this stage. Common engineering materials are normally classified as metals and non- metals. Metals may conveniently be divided into ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Important ferrous metals for the present purpose are: (i) cast iron (ii) wrought iron (iii) steel. Some of the important non-ferrous metals used in engineering design are: (a) Light metal group such as aluminium and its alloys, magnesium and manganese alloys. (b) Copper based alloys such as brass (Cu-Zn), bronze (Cu-Sn). (c) White metal group such as nickel, silver, white bearing metals eg. SnSb7Cu3, Sn60Sb11Pb, zinc etc. Cast iron, wrought iron and steel will now be discussed under separate headings.
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