flow1 - 53:030 Class Notes C.C Swan University of Iowa...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Period #7: Fluid Flow in Soils (I) A. Motivation: The ability of engineers to understand and predict the flow of fluids (usually water) in soils is essential for many application in civil engineering. Some typical examples are as follows: (i) environmental engineering: When toxic liquids are retained in holding lagoons, important questions that need to be answered are: --> At what rate is toxic fluid escaping the holding lagoon? --> How long might it take the fluid to reach the ground water table? --> What can be done to slow down the rate of escape of the pollutant? 1 53:030 Class Notes; C.C. Swan, University of Iowa Toxic Fluid
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ii) construction engineering: When building structures in relatively shallow bodies of water, it is fairly common construction practice to build a temporary sheet-pile cofferdam structure around the site and to pump the water out. Important questions that would need to be answered are: --> What will be the rate of water inflow to the site ? (so that the pump can be sized) --> Is it possible that the soil will liquify and endanger construction workers? Our objective is to gain an understanding of the mechanics of fluid flow in soils so that engineering problems of this type can eventually be addressed. 2 53:030 Class Notes; C.C. Swan, University of Iowa
Background image of page 2
B. Fluid at Rest in Soil (No Flow Occurring) Beneath the water table: Fluid pressure is hydrostatic: p(z) = γ w z This fluid pressure is really a "gauge" pressure in that the atmospheric pressure
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/10/2010 for the course CIVIL 53:30 taught by Professor Swan during the Fall '09 term at University of Iowa.

Page1 / 11

flow1 - 53:030 Class Notes C.C Swan University of Iowa...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online