compact1 - 53:030 Class Notes; C.C. Swan, University of...

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Period #25: Compaction of Soils (I) A. What is Compaction? In most instances in civil engineering and/or construction practice, whenever soils are imported or excavated and re-applied, they are compacted . The terms compaction and consolidation may sound as though they describe the same thing, but in reality they do not. consolidation : Static loads are applied to saturated soils, and over a period of time the increased stresses are transferred to the soil skeleton, leading to a reduction in void ratio. Depending on the permeability of the soil and the magnitude of the drainage distance, this can be a very time-consuming process. Tyically applies to existing, undisturbed soil deposits. compaction : When loose soils are applied to a construction site, compressive mechanical energy is applied to the soil using special equipment to densify the soil (or reduce the void ratio). Typically applies to soils that are being applied or re-applied to a site. 1 53:030 Class Notes; C.C. Swan, University of Iowa
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B. Motivation for Compaction: Compaction increases the skeletal (or dry) density of soils for a wide range of construction applications. As examples: highway embankments backfilled trenches earthen dams sub-foundation soils Compaction generally leads to the following desirable effects on soils: 1) increased shear strength; This means that larger loads can be applied to compacted soils since they are typically stronger. 2) reduced compressibility; This also means that larger loads can be applied to compacted soils since they will produce smaller settlements. 3) reduced permeability; This inhibits soils’ ability to absorb water, and therefore reduces the tendency to expand/shrink and potentially liquefy. 53:030 Class Notes; C.C. Swan, University of Iowa
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2010 for the course CIVIL 53:30 taught by Professor Swan during the Fall '09 term at University of Iowa.

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compact1 - 53:030 Class Notes; C.C. Swan, University of...

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