Poverty & Aid 9-29

Poverty & Aid 9-29 - Global Poverty &...

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Unformatted text preview: Global Poverty & International Aid 9-27-2010 The Question: What obligations do individual citizens of wealthy nations (for example, you) have towards people suffering from poverty in faraway countries? Some numbers: Global Poverty Some Numbers: Global Poverty Every year more than 6 million children under the age of five die from preventable causes (malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia). More than 50% of Africans suffer from water-related diseases (cholera, infant diarrhea). 3 Million people per year die from malaria. Of the 300 million children who go to bed hungry each night, more than 90% are suffering long-term malnutrition. More than 2.6 billion do not have basic water sanitation; more than 1 billion use unsafe drinking water sources. Women in Africa have a 1 in 16 chance of dying in pregnancy or childbirth. ( 1 in 3,700 in North America). Peter Singer Born 1946 Career at Monash University (1977- 1999) and Princeton University (1999-Present) Author of: Famine, Affluence, and Morality (1972) Animal Liberation (1975) Singers Argument: P1: Suffering and death from lack of food, shelter, and medical care are bad. P2: If it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening, without thereby sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance , we ought, morally, to do it. (STRONG version) . . .without thereby sacrificing anything morally significant , we ought to do it (WEAK version) P3: Most of us are in a position to prevent suffering and death (bad things) without sacrificing anything of (equal?) moral importance (new clothes, nice dinner, booze, movies). Singers Conclusion: We have a moral duty to prevent suffering and death, even if it requires sacrificing luxuries for ourselves that we could afford to enjoy. Theoretical Interlude 1 Philosophers divide actions into several categories: Morally Prohibited . Actions that are not prohibited are: Morally Permitted. Actions that are permitted are either:...
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2010 for the course PHIL 140 taught by Professor ??? during the Fall '08 term at Maryland.

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Poverty & Aid 9-29 - Global Poverty &...

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