overviewofwaterresources

- PowerPoint-Course Title Instructor information I Introduction A Overview of Water Resources and Watershed Management or Watershed Planning The

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PowerPoint--Course Title, Instructor information-- I. Introduction A. Overview of Water Resources and Watershed Management or Watershed Planning The purpose of the first section or two is to give background and to delineate the unique facets of the water picture which will be the concern of this particular course. The initial readings in the text and handouts set the stage for subsequent chapters which will be studied in detail and are the major concern for this course. PowerPoint--Importance of water (National Wildlife Federation)-- The current textbook is called Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds . Previous texts have included the terminology---“Rangeland Watershed Management” and “Wildland Watershed Management”. What are rangelands? (Land managed extensively (ecologically) for production of forage….) some would say land that provides habitat for wildlife and domestic livestock-----this would include almost any land being managed with ecological principles---excluding cropland and land in urban or industrial use. “Rangeland” includes grasslands, shrublands, forested lands, etc.
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In a very broad sense, rangelands are “wildlands”. About 72% of the land area in the U.S. which supports only 10% of the population is in so-called “wildlands” or “rangelands.” 25% is cropland and 2-3% is urban. In the 11 conterminous western states of Arizona, Colorado, California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Montana, Wyoming, and Utah over 90% of the usable water originates from “rangelands” or “wildlands”. PowerPoint--Water Volume Distribution (USGS)-- Let us begin by looking at the Earth’s water supply: 97% is salty 2+% is ice (glaciers and polar caps) >1% is fresh water and generally available for human use and consumption In the Unites States some 1.3 billion acre feet (1.6 trillion cu. meters) of water is carried annually by rivers and streams (8.1 inches [206 mm] of water over the whole country). Overall precipitation average= 30 inches [762 mm], therefore about 22 inches [559 mm] evaporates. PPT Lubbock ± 18.5 inches [470 mm]. Renewable resource “cyclical resource”.
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Contrast with non-renewable sources: oil, metals, etc. and “slower renewable”. Atmosphere water content is about 1 inch [25.4 mm] or about a 10-day precipitation supply for the world on the average, therefore : the hydrologic cycle must continually function to provide continuous precipitation. PowerPoint--Volume equivalents--
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2010 for the course NRM 4314 taught by Professor Fish during the Fall '10 term at Texas Tech.

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- PowerPoint-Course Title Instructor information I Introduction A Overview of Water Resources and Watershed Management or Watershed Planning The

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