The Culture of Wilderness

The Culture of Wilderness - The Culture of Wilderness...

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“The Culture of Wilderness: Agriculture as Colonization in the American West” By: Frieda Knobloch Book Review Leslie Hughes
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Book Review “The Culture of Wilderness: Agriculture as Colonization in the American West” by Frieda Knobloch, is a historical look back at different agricultural practices that shaped the American West starting in Europe and the Roman and Greek empires. Knobloch ties the agricultural practices of Rome and Greece with American agriculture which is a connection not normally acknowledged in most critical evaluations of American agriculture. This book is very complex in content, full of facts, dates, names etc. but very simple in its organization of thoughts. Knobloch addresses American agriculture with four chapters: Trees, Plows, Grass, and Weeds. These are the fundamental agricultural practices that drove American civilization west of the Mississippi river. When addressing these four driving colonial factors Knobloch also addresses how each one of them had not only agricultural impacts but how they influenced domination between gender, race, and class in different ways. Through these dominations Knobloch traces the development of wilderness to culture. The four topics she uses all seem to mirror each other in the processes and development they went through as well as the social and environmental impacts they had on the American West. First, is the liquidation and management of Trees. Knobloch argues that
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