Phil-100A-Hndt-5-F-10

5 if creakle acted meanly and unfairly then he acted

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Unformatted text preview: joyed causing the boys to suffer, singling out the chubby boys for special attention. (4) If Creakle enjoyed causing the boys to suffer, singling out the chubby boys for special attention, then he acted in a mean and unfair way. Therefore, (2) Creakle acted in a mean and unfair way. (5) If Creakle acted meanly and unfairly, then he acted immorally. Therefore, (3) Creakle acted immorally. Because he does not yet have access to a moral theory, Copperfield won’t be able to defend his belief in (4) and his belief in (5) with much in the way of argument. Instead, his beliefs in these moderately complex moral principles will have the affective and cognitive backing of empathetic objectivity (see Moral Epistemology, pp. 79-80). They are supported by: (a) the fact that he cannot imagine how they could fail to be true, and (b) the negative emotions he feels toward people who act in the specified ways, emotions that remain when he adopts various alternative perspectives. To argue that Copperfield can know (4) and (5) in these circumstances is to argue for non ­inferential knowledge...
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2010 for the course PHIL 100A taught by Professor Mcmahon during the Fall '09 term at UCSB.

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