3 - Lecture 3: Amino acids and their properties Thursday,...

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Lecture 3: Amino acids and their properties Thursday, August 12, 2010
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Please take note!!! It is extremely advisable to make a set of flashcards of the 20 amino acids and learn them. This will be a signifcant portion oF Midterm I. The things you should know about each amino acid (at least!) is: • the name, including its three-letter and one-letter abbreviations (example: Alanine, Ala, A). • the chemical structure of each and be able to draw it. • the approximate pK of each side chain that contains a functional group capable of acid/base chemistry (example: glutamic acid, pK ~ 4). You should know these within ±1 pH unit! Thursday, August 12, 2010
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What is an amino acid? (you should know this by now!) Amino acids are α-amino-substituted carboxylic acids, and the basic building block of proteins. Each amino acid contains the general structure: form at physiological pH Thursday, August 12, 2010
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The properties of the twenty amino acids depend upon their R-group These side chains are hydrophobic (nonpolar; describes molecules or groups that are insoluble in water). In a folded protein they are generally found on the inside. Thursday, August 12, 2010
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These side chains, on the other hand, can be found on the surface of folded proteins as they are HYDROPHILIC. Thursday, August 12, 2010
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Cysteine is unique among the amino acids in that it can easily engage in REDOX (reduction/oxidation) chemistry. In proteins, these amino acids are can be oxidized to form DISULFIDE linkages (or cystine residues) Thursday, August 12, 2010
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interactions as well as polar interactions in the case of Tyr and Trp. Thursday, August 12, 2010
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3 - Lecture 3: Amino acids and their properties Thursday,...

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