4 - Lecture 4: Purification of proteins Thursday, August...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 4: Purification of proteins Thursday, August 12, 2010 Almost every biochemistry laboratory studies proteins and their function. While genetic approaches to understanding the function of gene product involve mutagenesis and observing the resulting phenotypes, biochemistry traditionally uses the opposite approach, which is to purify a protein to near homogeneity and study its chemistry. Thus, for the biochemist, protein purification represents a significant amount of time in the laboratory and is crucial for successful experiments. Thursday, August 12, 2010 1. Protein Sources A typical biochemistry laboratory will use proteins from a variety of sources: From parent organism : protein source is from the organism that produces it. From a recombinant source: The protein of choice is overproduced in an organism that is easy to culture and can express the protein in large quantities. Bacterial source: Escherichia coli Yeast: Pichia pastoris Eukaryotic: Baculovirus system (insect cells), mammalian tissue culture...
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2010 for the course CHEN 3320 at Colorado.

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4 - Lecture 4: Purification of proteins Thursday, August...

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